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Stool 60 by Alvar Aalto.
© 2014 Alex James Bruce
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Stool 60 by Alvar Aalto.

© 2014 Alex James Bruce


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Wicked: Jaywick Methodist Church, Clacton, Essex-


Jaywick Methodist Church can be found in Clacton on Sea, Essex. The 1960s church is constructed of red brick, has an asymmetrical pitched roof and is faced with white painted wood cladding. The church also has large coloured glass windows to both the front and back of the building.

© 2014 Alex James Bruce 


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Crazy Paving: Tottenham Court Road Station Mosaics by Eduardo Paolozzi-

Eduardo Paolozzi was a Scottish sculptor and artist. He was influential on the art scene in the 1950s and his work was considered a precursor to the pop art movement. He designed these mosaic murals for Tottenham Court Road Underground station in 1982. The multicoloured ceramic mosaics can be found on the central line platforms as well as at the top and bottom of the escalators.

© 2014 Alex James Bruce 


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Stained glass at Upper Norwood Methodist Church, Crystal Palace, London.
© 2014 Alex James Bruce
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Stained glass at Upper Norwood Methodist Church, Crystal Palace, London.

© 2014 Alex James Bruce


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Mid-Century Tiles at Bernard Morgan House, Golden Lane, London.
© 2014 Alex James Bruce
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Mid-Century Tiles at Bernard Morgan House, Golden Lane, London.

© 2014 Alex James Bruce


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Live Work Space (Part 2): The Aalto House and studio by Alvar Aalto, Helsinki-


Aalto designed his Helsinki home and Studio in 1935.  The double height studio features a gallery that could be used to view architectural models and plans from above. The formal living room and dining room on the ground floor is flooded with light thanks to the huge south facing windows.  There is another informal living room, with fireplace, on the first floor that was used by the family. Aalto’s furniture and lighting, produced by Artek, features prominently in the house, as well as lighting by Poul Henningsen,  produced by Louis Poulsen. For images of the exterior of the property see previous post (HERE). For more interior images click (HERE).

© 2014 Alex James Bruce


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Cuthbert Harrowing House, Golden Lane Estate, London by Chamberlin Powell and Bon.
© 2014 Alex James Bruce
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Cuthbert Harrowing House, Golden Lane Estate, London by Chamberlin Powell and Bon.

© 2014 Alex James Bruce


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Material Boy: Fabric by Alvar Aalto-

This fabric was designed by Alvar Aalto and can be found hanging at his studio in Munkkiniemi in Helsinki, FInland. The pattern is similar to his Siena fabric which he designed in 1954 for Artek but unfortunately unlike Siena this design is not currently in production.
© 2014 Alex James Bruce
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Material Boy: Fabric by Alvar Aalto-


This fabric was designed by Alvar Aalto and can be found hanging at his studio in Munkkiniemi in Helsinki, FInland. The pattern is similar to his Siena fabric which he designed in 1954 for Artek but unfortunately unlike Siena this design is not currently in production.

© 2014 Alex James Bruce


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Atelier Aalto (Part 2): Alvar Aalto’s Self Designed Studio-


Located in Munkkiniemi, on the outskirts of Helsinki in Finland, Aalto’s studio was built in 1955. The street facing side of the L-shaped, white painted brick and timber structure is windowless. The white brick wall is broken only by a wood panneled section that juts out concealing a glass skylight. The rear of the building features large windows on both sides allowing light to flood into the two studios. The sloped garden at the rear was terraced to form an amphitheatre, with the large white wall at the bottom acting as a screen to project movies and slide shows on to. For more images click (HERE).

© 2014 Alex James Bruce


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